Farmer’s Rye Loaf

This loaf is quick to make (compared to a sourdough) but still has a complex rye flavour, helped along by the addition of molasses.

The molasses also give colour I the finished loaf, which can be baked free form, like this one, or in a loaf tin. If baking in a loaf tin, decrease the temperature by 10 degrees and cook for the full 45 minutes to ensure it is cooked through.20140713-195340-71620200.jpg
Farmer ‘s Rye Loaf makes one loaf

350g strong white flour
225g wholemeal rye flour
12g salt
25g butter, diced
7g instant yeast
30g molasses
150g warm milk
150g warm water

1. Combine the dry ingredients, and then mix in the wet ingredients and the butter. Mix well to combine all ingredients.
2. At this stage an autolyse is optional, but will make kneading a little easier. Autolyse for 20 min if you want to.
3. Knead for 10 min and place into a lightly oiled bowl. Cover and bulk ferment for 2 hours or until doubled.
4. Tip the dough out onto a clean surface and shape into a round, or shape for a loaf tin. If making a round, place onto a sheet of baking paper and cover loosely with cling film.
5. Proof for 1 1/2 hours or until visibly risen and springy to the touch. Preheat oven to 200C. If using, place a baking stone or pizza stone Ito the oven.
6. Score the loaf with an X on top, then slide onto a baking tray and place into the oven, or directly into the oven if using a stone. Bake for 35-45 minutes until the loaf is hollow sounding when tapped on the bottom and a dark golden brown colour.
7. Cool on a wire rack for at least an hour.

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Crumpets!

I love crumpets. I can’t take any credit for this recipe- it comes from a very well researched post from The Guardian, that certainly worked well.

It’s a slow process- especially when you realise jut before cooking that you only have flower shaped rings, and only one of those… But it is definitely worth it.

Always expect the first one to stick to the ring, the pan, and everything else nearby.
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The next ones will be better…

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Simple Fruit soda bread

Soda bread is about as quick as it gets, with the exception of some flatbreads that don’t require any resting time. This recipe takes a fairly traditional Irish soda bread and adds a cinnamon and fruit twist.

Because of the lack of kneading and proofing, and the long baking time, this loaf is also ideal for gluten free baking: you can substitute the flour for all purpose gluten free flour (and make sure that the baking soda is also GF)

As making soda bread is more like baking a cake than a loaf, my measurements here are in (Australian) volume rather than weight.

Fruit soda bread makes one loaf

2 cups plain (all purpose) flour
1/2 cup flaxseed (linseed)
1/2 tsp salt
2 tsp baking soda
1 tsp ground cinnamon
1 tbsp agave or honey
1 tbsp cold butter, diced
1 cup mixed currants and sultanas
2 large eggs, lightly beaten
1 tbsp apple cider vinegar
1 cup milk, plus extra

1. Mix all of the ingredients in a large bowl. Thoroughly combine all of the ingredients.
2. Preheat oven to 190C
3. Grease a 900g loaf tin and line with baking paper. Pour the mix into the tin and push down so that it fills any gaps.
4. Bake for 45 minutes. Test by inserting a cake skewer, which should come out clean. If it looks like the top might burn cover loosely with tin foil.
5. Cool for 10 minutes in the tin, then too out onto a wire rack and cool completely.

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