Sourdough baking on a work night: the complete method

Earlier in the week I wrote three separate posts following the process of making sourdough on a weeknight, from mixing the dough on day one to shaping and bakin on day two. This post brings all three steps together with the recipe.

   
 Weekday light rye – makes two loaves 

  • 800g strong white flour
  • 200g rye flour
  • 650g water
  • 50g white sourdough starter
  • 20g salt

Day one – the dough

  • 6pm: mix all of the ingredients in a large bowl. Rest for 15 minutes.
  • 6:15pm: stretch/fold the dough several times. Rest for another 15 minutes and repeat. Do this another 3 times, making 5 stretch/folds in total. 
  • 7:15pm: after the final stretch/fold, oil the bowl, form the dough into a ball, and place back into the bowl. Cover with cling film and rest at room temperature overnight.

Day two: morning – shaping

  • 7am: divide the dough and shape into two boules. I have used the shaping method explained in my bulk sourdough post. Rest for 15 minutes.
  • 7:15am: reshape the dough, rest for another 15 minutes, then reshape a final time and place seam side up into a floured banneton.
  • 7:30am: place the shaped loaves in bannetons into plastic bags, and place in the fridge.

Day two: evening – baking

  • 5:30pm: Preheat oven to 230C with two cast iron lidded pots (Dutch ovens) on the middle shelf.
  • 5:30pm: Remove the loaves from the fridge whilst the oven preheats.
  • 6pm: Turn the loaves out onto a floured peel, score, and place into the pots.
  • 6pm-6:30pm: Bake for 15 minutes with the lid on, then remove the lid for a further 15 minutes.
  • 6:30pm: Cool on a wire rack for at least an hour before slicing

Live sourdough: baking on a work night pt. 3

This is the final part of a three part post following the step by step process of baking sourdough during the week.

  
The first part of the post contains the recipe for a light rye sourdough, but the method can be applied to many recipes. The first steps involved mixing and several stretch/folds of the dough, followed by a long overnight bulk ferment at room temperature.

The second part of the post was written this morning, after dividing and shaping the dough, placing into bannetons, and proofing in the fridge.

  
This final part deals with the baking of the loaf, designed to fit easily into a work-night schedule. The timings given are what I used, but the dough can happily sit in the fridge for longer.

Method part three

  1. 5:30pm: Preheat oven to 230C with two cast iron lidded pots (Dutch ovens) on the middle shelf.
  2. 5:30pm: Remove the loaves from the fridge whilst the oven preheats.
  3. 6pm: Turn the loaves out onto a floured peel, score, and place into the pots.
  4. 6pm-6:30pm: Bake for 15 minutes with the lid on, then remove the lid for a further 15 minutes.
  5. 6:30pm: Cool on a wire rack for at least an hour before slicing.

This bread will keep for several days and also freezes well, presliced, for several months.

I hope that this method works for you, if it does, let me know via Twitter by messaging @breadbarnone

Live sourdough: baking on a work night pt. 2

This is part two of a recipe for sourdough on a work night. In part one I mixed the ingredients, did a few stretch/folds, and bulk fermented the dough overnight. 

  
The dough, divided and shaped into boules 

This morning I have divided the dough in two, shaped and rested, then reshaped, and then placed the dough to proof on the fridge during the day.

  
Floured and placed into bannetons, with the seam pinched tight. 

Method part two

  1. 7am: divide the dough and shape into two boules. I have used the shaping method explained in my bulk sourdough post. Rest for 15 minutes.
  2. 7:15am: reshape the dough, rest for another 15 minutes, then reshape a final time and place seam side up into a floured banneton.
  3. 7:30am: place the shaped loaves in bannetons into plastic bags, and place in the fridge.

These loaves will stay I the fridge until I get back from work this afternoon, and will be baked straight from the fridge…